Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Biopolymers and Bioplastics San Antonio,Texas,USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Richard A. Gross

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), USA

Keynote: Structure property relationships of biobased epoxy resins

Time : 09:30-09:55

OMICS International Biopolymers and Bioplastics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Richard A. Gross photo
Biography:

Richard A. Gross is currently a Full Professor and a Constellation Chaired Professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). His research is focused on developing biocatalytic routes to biobased materials including monomers, macromers, prepolymers, polymers, surfactants and other biochemicals. He has over 500 publications in peer reviewed journals, been cited about 18,000 times (h-index 71), edited 7-books and has 26 patents (granted or filed). Prof. Gross was the recipient of the 2003 Presidential Green Chemistry Award in the academic category. In 2010 he was selected as the Turner Alfrey Visiting Professor and in 2015 he became a Fellow of the ACS Polymer Division. He founded SyntheZyme LLC in 2009 and serves as CTO.

Abstract:

Levulinic acid is produced from cellulose, the most abundant biomacromolecule on the planet, by the acid hydrolysis of cellulose and resulting C6 sugars. Diphenolic acid (DPA) is synthesized by condensation of levulinic acid with two equivalents of phenol. A series of bio-based epoxy monomers were prepared from diphenolic acid (DPA) by transforming the free acid into n-alkyl esters and the phenolic hydroxyl groups into diglycidyl ethers. Increasing the chain length of DGEDP n-alkyl esters from methyl to n-pentyl resulted in large decreases in epoxy resin viscosity (700-to-11Pa.s). The storage modulus of DPA epoxy resins, cured with isophorone diamine, also varied with n-alkyl ester chain length (e.g. 3300 and 2100 MPa for thernrnmethyl and n-pentyl esters). The Young’s modulus and tensile strengths were about 1,150 and 40 MPa, respectively, for all the cured resins tested (including DGEBA) and varied little as a function of ester length. This work demonstrates that diglycidyl ethers of n-alkyl diphenolates represent a new family of bio-based liquid epoxy resins that, when cured, have similar properties to those from DGEBA.rnrnCombinations of DGEDP-Me, a rigid high viscosity biobased epoxy resin, and a flexible lower viscosity epoxy resin from cashew nut shell liquid (NC-514), provided control of the resin viscosity and important improvements in cured epoxy resin toughness relative to the neat resins. Relative to the neat high viscosity resin, 1:1 w/w mixtures of the rigid and flexible epoxy resin components gave increases in the impact strength and mode I fracture toughness of 136% and 66%, respectively. The monofunctional glycidyl ether of eugenol (GE) was used as a reactive diluent for the diglycidyl ether of DGEDP-Pe. Viscosities of GE and DGEDP-Pe are 25 mPa.s and 11 Pa.s, respectively. GE/DGEDP-Pe epoxy resins with 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 wt % GE were analyzed for viscosity reductions, and, subsequently, cured with isophorone diamine. The glassy modulus of cured GE/DGEDP-Pe epoxy resins remained between 2000 and 3000 MPa. The role of GE as a reactive diluent will be discussed and a 15% loading was determined to be suitable for a vacuum infusion epoxy resin/glass composite system.

Keynote Forum

Dean C. Webster

North Dakota State University, USA

Keynote: Bio-based thermosets from star-like highly functional reactive resins

Time : 09:55-10:20

OMICS International Biopolymers and Bioplastics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dean C. Webster photo
Biography:

Dean Webster is Professor and Chair in the Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials at North Dakota State University. He received a B.S. in Chemistry and a Ph.D. in Materials Engineering Science both from Virginia Tech. Prior to joining NDSU in 2001 he worked for Sherwin-Williams and at Eastman Chemical Company. He is the recipient of the 2011 Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings Science given by the American Chemical Society,the 2013 Joesph Mattiello Lecture award given by the American Coatings Association, and the Waldron Research Award given by the NDSU Alumni Association. His research is in the area of new high performance polymer systems for coatings and composites, nanocomposites, polymers for marine antifouling coatings, and use of renewable resources in polymers and coatings systems.

Abstract:

A challenge faced with transitioning from polymer materials derived from petrochemical sources to bio-based sources is in designing materials having the performance properties required for today’s applications. High performance thermoset polymers are used in applications such as coatings, composites, and adhesives and are made in-situ from the reactions of functional low molecular weight resins or functional oligomers. While vegetable oils are a readily available and amenable to functionalization to be used in thermosets, their long aliphatic hydrocarbon chains tend to result in materials that are soft and flexible. However, we have found that by creating multifunctional resins from vegetable oil fatty acids and a highly functional polyol, thermosets can be formed that have the strength and stiffness for use in high performance coatings and composites. For example, epoxidized sucrose esters crosslinked with cyclic anhydrides yield thermosets having modulus values exceeding 1 GPa. Polyurethanes made using highly functional soy polyols have glass transition temperatures exceeding 100 °C, much higher than typical soy-based polyols. Methacrylated sucrose esters can be used to form high performance composites using either glass or natural fibers. It has also been discovered that 100% bio-based thermosets can be made from the water-catalyzed crosslinking of epoxidized sucrose soyate with naturally-occurring acids.

OMICS International Biopolymers and Bioplastics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Amar Mohanty photo
Biography:

Prof. Amar Mohanty, Professor and Ontario Premier’s Research Chair in Biomaterials and Transportation at the University of Guelph, Canada is an international leader in the field of biomaterials with a focus in engineering new sustainable materials. Prof. Mohanty's research interests are focused on the bioeconomy R&D related to biobased materials and biorefinery (value-added uses of coproducts/byproducts from biofuel and food industries). He has more than 700 publications to his credit, including 284 peer-reviewed journal papers, 380 conference presentations/abstracts, 4 edited books, 18 book chapters, and 46 Patents awarded/applied. Hi research has been cited totally 18,275 times as reported by Google Scholar (Sep. 7, 2016) with an h-index of 64 and an i10-index of 202. His RG score is reported as high as 45.21 by ResearchGate (Sep. 7, 2016)  which is higher than that of 97.5% of ResearchGate members. He received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the BioEnvironmental Polymer Society (BEPS) in 2015. Prof. Mohanty is an accomplished researcher and was the holder of the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship at the Technical University of Berlin, Germany. He received the Andrew Chase Forest Products Division Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and was also the the Jim Hammer Memorial Service Awardee from the BioEnvironmental Polymer Society. Dr. Mohanty serves as Editorial Board Member for seven international journals.

Abstract:

Renewable resource-based nature of bioplastics and biobased materials is not enough in bringing these emerging bioproducts to market place for societal benefit. Circular economy is a concept that targets waste minimization through a closed loop system thereby helping a sustainable development. The co-product and byproduct of one industry can find value-added uses if appropriately integrated in the design and engineering of biobased materials of commercial attraction. Bioplastic as such may be comparatively expensive as compared to traditional and petro-based plastics. An undervalued co-product of one industry can be integrated into a bioplastic in creating novel biobased materials for new industrial uses. The coproducts from biofuel, pyrolysis as well as food processing industries show immense potential as fillers or reinforcing materials for plastics in creating a range of eco-friendly and sustainable biocomposites. This presentation will provide an overview on the recent development of these biobased composite materials for industrial uses in green packaging, consumer products and light weight auto-parts.

Break:
Group Photo and Coffee Break: 10:45 -11:05 @ Foyer
  • Track 6: Biomaterials and Biopolymers
Location: Texas B
Speaker

Chair

David Grewell

Iowa State University, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Chang-Sik Ha

Pusan National University, Korea

Session Introduction

Rina Singh

Biotechnology Innovation Organization, USA

Title: Political landscape for bioplastics and biobased materials

Time : 11:05-11:25

Speaker
Biography:

Rina Singh is director of policy in the industrial biotechnology and environmental section of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO). She previously served as the business development manager at Ashland Inc. She was appointed by the president and CEO as member of an innovative 10-member team assembled to develop a new strategic direction for Ashland, identifying investment opportunities for $1.5 billion resulting from divesture of petroleum refining operations. She held general management positions in the technology and business development areas of Ashland, including bioproducts business development manager and platform technology manager. She started her career at The Dow Chemical Co. as a senior research chemist in the Engineering Thermoplastics Group. The holder of 24 patents and publications, Singh received a B.S., a doctorate in natural products (synthetic organic chemistry) and a post-doctoral degree in polymer science from McGill University.

Abstract:

There continues to be an increased interest in synthesizing renewable chemicals from renewable resources, even with the downturn in economy, which has slowed down the time it takes to reach commercial reality, but there still continues to be partnerships and business deals in the making. As a result of the early commercialization of renewable chemicals such as 1,2-propyleneglycol,1,3-propanediol, bioethanol, polylactic acid (PLA), polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), and more recently, polyethyleneterephthalic acid (PET), this has encouraged interest nationally and internationally to further build on these early successes. Investments through partnerships are occurring globally involving multitude of startup companies, and amongst mature chemical companies engaged in building their product portfolios. There is interest in complementing existing product pipelines from incumbent technologies with renewably derived products from renewable sources, providing options for consumers to select sustainable products. Now there are both federal and state polices encouraging the growth in this sector, which once, were only in discussion stages. The presentation will focus on the policies impacting the growth of the sector, and will provide the commercial status of building blocks for bioplastics and biobased materials.

Chang-Sik Ha

Pusan National University, Korea

Title: Biopolymer based bionanocomposites

Time : 11:25-11:45

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Chang-Sik Ha received his ph.D. from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology(KAIST), Seoul, Korea (1987). He has joined at the Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Pusan National University as a professor since 1982. He is now a director of the Pioneer Research Center for Nanogrid Materials. He served as a Vice President of Pusan National University in 2012. He has served as an editorial board member of several international journals including an Associate Editor of the Advanced Porous Materials as well as an Associate Editor of the Composite Interfaces.

Abstract:

We have prepared several biopolymer based bionanocomposites for years. Those biopolymers include chitosan (CS), poly(lactic acid), or poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate), etc., while partner polymers or inorganic fillers for bionanocompositres include clay, graphene oxide, carbon nanotube, and silver, etc. to prepare those bionanocomposites. A series of works on the bionanocomposites will be discussed in this talk, Here, one example is the CS contaiing bionanocomposites. CS is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and non-toxic natural polymer and has applications in wound healing, tissue repair, antimicrobial resistance, cell adhesion, and food delivery. In this presentation, we report the facile synthesis of hierarchical mesoporous bio-polymer/silica composite materials with bimodal mesopores using a dual-template of the cationic N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan ( TMCs) and the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) via one-step synthetic strategy. The mesoporous bio-polymer/silica composites encapsulate a large number of guest drug molecules, Ibuprofen (IBU) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), due to their high surface area and pore volume. In addition, the mesoporous chitosan-silica composites also had a long term biocompatibility for the target release of the drug molecules to the CEM cells and MCF cells etc. as well as a pH sensitive controlled release behavior of the drug molecules. We also present functionalized graphene oxides (GO) with chitosan (FGOCs). FGOCs were found to significantly improve the solubility of the GO in aqueous acidic media. And more topics using other biopolymers will be dealt with in this talk.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Rein Ulijn, Ph.D., is the founding director of the ASRC's Nanoscience Initiative. Appointed in February 2014, he is also the Einstein Professor of Chemistry at Hunter College. Dr. Ulijn joined CUNY from the University of Strathclyde, in Glasgow, Scotland, where he ran an acclaimed nanochemistry lab and served as vice dean of research. He is a pioneer in an area of nanoscience—the study and control of matter on atomic and molecular scales—that focuses on creating materials and systems that are inspired by biology and have unique “adaptive” properties. He leads a team that has developed and commercialized gel technologies that mimic biological environments, important discoveries for the advance of stem cell research, drug development and tissue-engineering techniques designed to interfere with disease processes.

Abstract:

The tremendous functionality of living systems is based on sequence-specific polymers of overwhelming complexity. It is increasingly clear that structure and function may be found in much simpler oligomers, such as peptides. We are exploring the use of short peptides as tunable building blocks for supramolecular materials with myriad applications in biomedicine and nanotechnology. To date, most self-assembling peptides have been designed by copying nature or have been discovered serendipitously. We will report progress on the development of design rules for self-assembly of very short peptides consisting of <5 amino acids by exploring the entire sequence space. This includes the use of coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations, and the use of experimental dynamic peptide libraries, which allow the short peptide sequence space to be searched and navigated. The second part of the talk will focus on the development of active (non-equilibrium) supramolecular nanostructures using chemically fueled catalytic peptide self-assembly. Applications of peptides as cell culture matrices, bio/electronic interfaces and drug delivery vehicles will also be discussed.

Andriy Voronov

North Dakota State University, USA

Title: Free radical polymerization of acrylic monomers from plant oils

Time : 12:05-12:25

Speaker
Biography:

Andriy Voronov completed his academic education in the Ukraine, gaining an MS in Chemical Engineering in 1990 and a PhD in Polymer Chemistry from Lviv Polytechnic National University in 1994. He received tenure and was promoted to Associate Professor at Coatings and Polymeric Materials in 2013. Voronov was an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow at the University of Bayreuth, Germany, Visiting Scientist at Vienna University of Technology in Austria, Visiting Fellow at the University of Ulm, Germany and Institute Charles Sadron, CNRS, Strasbourg, France. Published >90 articles, 8 book chapters, >40 preprints, filed 7 patents/patent applications.

Abstract:

Most currently available syntheses of polymers from plant oils are limited to polycondensation and oxypolymerization. Both mechanisms result in formation of exclusively cross-linked polymers, widely applicable in industrial coatings. Because of highly hydrophobic nature of triglyceride molecules, the development of waterborne polymeric materials (in particular, latexes) from plant oils has been challenging. One-step method converts fatty acid esters of vegetable oils into bio-based acrylic monomers for free radical polymerization. While the vinyl bond of these monomers is reactive in conventional addition chain polymerization and facilitates macromolecular chain growth, the double bonds of the fatty acid chains are unaffected during the free radical polymerization. Currently exemplified for soybean, linseed, sunflower and olive oil (possessing remarkably different compositions of fatty acids in triglycerdies) monomers can be applied in the production of latexes that utilize acrylic monomers and polymers. The plant oil-based monomers offer unique functionality due to nature of double bonds, which allows forming linear macromolecules as well as “on-demand’ cross-linking, and provides an ability to tune final material properties, including hydrophobicity. The reactivity ratios of the synthesized monomers in free radical copolymerization with petroleum-based counterparts, as well as theirs Q-e parameters, indicate that new monomers behave in copolymerization as conventional vinyl monomers. The resulting copolymers are capable of post-polymerization oxidative reactions to form cross-linked polymer structures, or of modification of unsaturated fatty acid chains. Specifically, degree of unsaturation in fatty acids was utilized as a criterion for comparing monomers behavior in addition chain polymerization and copolymerization to yield biobased polymer latexes.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Bo Chen is a principal scientist in Relypsa focusing on microparticles as toxin binders for various diseases. After his PhD in 2006 from New York University School of Engineering and postdoctoral studies from University of California San Francisco in 2009. He started his Sanofi-Genzyme career in Biomaterials and Drug Delivery Division. He left as a senior scientist in 2014 and joined biotech companies CPGJ (Shanghai) as an Associate Director, later in GrayBug Inc. He has broad experience in antibody drug conjugate (ADC) and drug delivery. He has published more than 20 papers/patents. He has been serving as a guest editor of Current Cancer Drug Targets since 2014.

Abstract:

Hyperkalemia is a potentially life-threatening condition, and patients who have chronic kidney disease, who are diabetic, or who are taking renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors are at increased risk. Therapeutic options for hyperkalemia tend to have limited effectiveness and can be associated with serious side effects. There is no new therapeutics for more than 50 years. Patiromer (USAN, trade name Veltassa) is a novel, spherical, nonabsorbed polymer designed to bind and remove potassium, primarily in the colon, thereby decreasing serum potassium in patients with hyperkalemia. The development process and the results of prelinical studies and early phase clinical study are reported here. Overall, patiromer is a high-capacity potassium binder, and the chemical and physical characteristics of patiromer can lead to good clinical efficacy, tolerability, and patient acceptance. It has been approved in 2015 by FDA used for the treatment of hyperkalemia.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Abidi is Associate Professor and Associate Director of the Fiber and Biopolymer Research Institute at Texas Tech University. He holds a “Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches” from the University of Haute Alsace in France and a Ph.D. from the University of Montpellier II in France. Dr. Abidi has generated more than 58 refereed journal publications, 1 book, 10 book chapters, more than 123 conference papers, 1 patent, 1 provisional patent, and 6 invention disclosures. The research focus of Dr. Abidi span from the characterization of biopolymers using advanced techniques to the development of bioproducts from biopolymers.

Abstract:

Cellulose is the most abundant natural polymer on earth. Cotton fiber is composed of 95% of cellulose. The dissolution of cellulose represents the first key step for most applications of cellulose and it is highly affected by its degree of polymerization (DP). Due to the high DP (9000-15000), the dissolution of cellulose is difficult to achieve under relatively mild conditions. Cellulose is a very stable polymer as it plays a crucial role in the structural soundness of plants. This stability makes it particularly difficult to deconstruct. The degree of insolubility is due to its chemical and physical structure. In order for dissolution to occur, a solvent must be able to penetrates between microfibrils and cellulose chains. The extent of the use of cellulose to develop an economically sustainable renewable bioproducts industry is limited due to its inefficient and incomplete dissolution in most common solvents. In this paper, we report on the dissolution of cellulose in three solvent systems: NaOH/urea, DMAC/LiCl and 3-butyl 1-immidazolum chloride ionic liquid (BmimCl)). Microcrystalline cellulose and cotton fibers were used as source of cellulose. Cellulose was dissolved in NaOH/urea, DMAC/LiCl, and ionic liquid (3-butyl 1-immidazolum chloride) followed by regeneration in water. Films and aerogel materials were formed from the cellulose gel. Electron scanning microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, BET, wide angle X-ray diffraction, were used to characterize the morphology, functional groups, surface porous morphology, and crystallinity.

Break:
Lunch Break: 13:10 - 14:10 @ Texas A
  • Track 6: Biomaterials and Biopolymers (Cont..)
Location: Texas B
Speaker

Chair

Richard A. Gross

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Noureddine Abidi

Texas Tech University, USA

Session Introduction

Baki Hazer

Bülent Ecevit University, Turkey

Title: Synthesis of biobased nano composite materials. metal nano particles stabilized in soy bean oil polymer

Time : 14:10-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Baki Hazer received his PhD degree from the Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University in 1978, and his M.S. and B.S. degrees in Chemical Engineering from the College of Chemical Engineering, University of Istanbul in 1972. He had an honorary membership by the Turkish Chemical Society in May 2005. He received Fulbright Fellowship and the NATO Collaborative Research Grant at the Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He was a Visiting Scientist for the NSF joint research project at The University of Akron. He is specialized in polymers from renewable sources, block and graft copolymers, macromonomeric initiators. He has published more than 140 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Polyunsaturated plant oils have gained great interest as monomers to produce biodegradable polymers obtained from renewable resources due to the limited existing sources of petroleum oil and environmental issues. Among them, soybean oil is a triglyceride of saturated and poly unsaturated fatty acids which can be polymerized via autoxidation by exposure to atmospheric oxygen at room temperature. Precious metals can catalyze the autoxidation process of unsaturated oils increasing the molecular weight with peroxide linkages in order to obtain soya oil polymer. The polymeric oil was fractionated by the extraction from the solvent-non-solvent mixture CHCl3/petroleum ether with the volume ratio of 5:15. Three polymeric oils fractions with different molecular weight (ca. 1000, 4000, and 40,000 g/mol) were obtained. Surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence emission of the nanocomposite solutions were observed. Transmission electron microscopy was used to determine size and shape of the metal nano particles. This macro peroxide initiator containing metal nanoparticles was used in free radical polymerization of some vinyl monomers in order to obtain olefin polymers containing metal nano particles. The detailed characterization of the composite materials was performed by NMR, FTIR, GPC, DSC and other physicochemical characterization methods.

Speaker
Biography:

Peter Gabriele joined Secant Medical in January 2012 as director, emerging technology to lead the advancement of corporate emerging technologies and manage strategic relationships with academia, research institutions and surgeon groups. He assumed the role of vice president, research and development, in September 2013. Today Gabriele is vice president of technology development. Gabriele has a Bachelor’s degree in biology/chemistry and a Master of Science degree in biochemistry from University of Hartford. He also holds Master of Science degrees from the University of Pennsylvania (PENN Engineering and The Wharton School of Business) and Johns Hopkins University (biotechnology). Gabriele holds over 40 U.S. and foreign patents issued and pending. He has published over 30 scientific and trade papers. He has received several awards, including the Roon Foundation Award for scientific contribution to coatings technology for his work in biocide photo-oxidation and the Dahlquest Award in adhesive science for advanced surface analysis.

Abstract:

One of the dominating “engineering features” of human organ systems is the variability of tissue modulus. Life is elastic. Yet, there are few bioelastomers available to the device designer that can be customized for a specific job. Secant Group has developed a new bioelastomer with inherent antimicrobial behavior that is the topic of this presentation. Medical device failure is in the news. We are facing an emerging crisis with implantable procedures from the combined effects of compliance mismatch and perioperative infection. After several decades of in vivo biomaterial “service” we are beginning to spot the consequences of exposing manmade materials to the human immune system. Are we truly using our integrated understanding of biotechnology, biomedical engineering, and bioengineering when we develop new engineering materials? There are two “pillars” to our immune system: the acute and the adaptive systems. The acute immune system is charged with managing janitorial duties like acute microbial infection; whereas, the adaptive immune system orchestrates the required remodeling of the wound space around an implanted device for a lifetime. A successful surgical implant must minimize the potential chaos of acute systems intervention in the adaptive healing process. Today, surgical site infection (SSI) and hospital acquired infection (HAI) have emerged as urgent issues associated with implant engineering. Poly (glycerol-sebacate) or PGS is a new bioelastomer that can be custom designed for tissue compliance while providing the wound space with antimicrobial properties and immunomodulation. PGS may be the next ‘Holy Grail’ bioelastomer for implant protection and wound care management.

Speaker
Biography:

Dula Man is an assistant professor at Delaware State University. He obtained his PhD degree in molecular biology from the University of Texas at El Paso, and did x-ray crystallography postdoc at University of California Irvine. Dr. Man has navigate the science fields from molecular biology, biochemistry, structural biology, DNA repair, genome edting to nanomaterial engineering. He published numerous refereed papers in those disciplines.

Abstract:

The core-sheath nanofiber and hydrogel exhibit great potential in drug delivery field. It is desirable to differentially control the release rate of different drugs from the same drug delivery vehicle. Biocompatible and biodegradable materials, polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers and alginate hydrogels, play a significant role in both designing controlled release matrix for cell culture and tissue growth. Although prolonged release of bioactive molecules is readily achievable using these polymer materials independently as a matrix, it is not seen how to release various bioactive molecules at a different rate over a different length of time. In this study, we fabricated a multilayer PCL-PEO core-sheath nanofiber scaffold in combination with sandwiched layers of either alginate hydrogel or uniaxial electrospun PCL-gelatin nanofiber layers, and evaluated its controlled release property. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or glucose was encapsulated in the PEO core of the core-sheath nanofibers, and the release kinetics was studied. We demonstrated that ATP release from the exposed top layer of the scaffold has higher burst release and shorter release time compared to that from deeper layers in the scaffolds. Such a differential release property of designated layers can be employed to achieve releasing of multiple drugs at different rates over a different length of time.

Speaker
Biography:

Manju Misra is a professor in the School of Engineering and holds a joint appointment in the Dept. of Plant Agriculture at the University of Guelph. Dr. Misra’s current research focuses primarily on novel bio-based composites and nanocomposites from agricultural and forestry resources for the sustainable bio-economy targeting the development of bio-based and eco-friendly alternatives to the existing petroleum-based products. She has authored more than 500 publications, including 280+ peer-reviewed journal papers, 24 book chapters, and 15 granted patents. She was an editor of the CRC Press volume, “Natural Fibers, Biopolymers and Biocomposites,” Taylor & Francis Group, Boca Raton, FL (2005); American Scientific Publishers volume “Packaging Nanotechnology”, Valencia, California, (2009) and “Polymer Nanocomposites”, Springer (2014). She was the chief editor of “Biocomposites: Design and Mechanical Performance” Woodhead Publishing (2015). She was the 2009 President of the BioEnvironmental Polymer Society (BEPS). She is one of the Associate Editors of the journal “Advanced Science Letters”. In 2012, Dr. Misra received the prestigious “Jim Hammer Memorial Award” in Texas, USA from the BioEnvironmental Polymer Society.

Abstract:

Glycerol is the primary co-product of biodiesel production with an estimated worldwide production of about 6 billion lbs per year by 2020. This biobased molecule is envisioned as a precursor for polymer synthesis among many other chemical syntheses which can be performed using glycerol as starting molecule. Succinic acid is a dicarboxylic acid which can now be commercially obtained from renewable resources through fermentation of biomass derived sugars. When these two monomers are combined, a biobased polymer termed poly glycerol succinate (PGS) is formed which has not yet found applications in the material science field limiting its adoption at commercial scale. In this work we have synthesized and employed PGS as a blending partner for PLA aiming to improve the tensile toughness of the blend system. The influence of the main synthesis parameters for PGS (molar ratio of reactants, monomer type and temperature of synthesis) in the mechanical behavior of PLA/PGS blends was investigated and a preferred set of synthesis conditions leading to an effective PLA toughening has been selected. Moreover, reactive extrusion has been performed utilizing free radical initiators in order to improve the compatibility of the phases in the blend. For this purpose a third monomer, maleic anhydride, was employed in the synthesis to create unsaturated poly glycerol succinate co maleate (PGSMA) polyesters which allows them to react from the unsaturation point in subsequent processing steps. It was seen that the addition of maleic anhydride as a monomer for the synthesis of PGSMA allows for the in situ compatibilization of PLA and PGSMA phases through the formation of PLA-g-PGSMA copolymers. With the in situ compatibilization effect taking place an effective toughening of PLA was achieved increasing the elongation at break of the blend from 3% for neat PLA to 150% for an 80/20 wt% PLA/PGSMA blend created in reactive extrusion mode.

Elodie Chevalier

Université de Lyon, France

Title: Production of an antimicrobial edible casein-based material

Time : 15:30-15:50

Speaker
Biography:

Elodie CHEVALIER, is a 2nd year-PhD student working at the University of Saint Etienne in the laboratory called IMP (Polymer Materials Engineering) with Frédéric PROCHAZKA and also working in the laboratory called BioDyMIA (Bioengineering and Microbial Dynamics at Food Interfaces) with Nadia OULAHAL. Prior to beginning the PhD program, Elodie CHEVALIER completed an engineering degree in Biology as well as a master degree in biotechnology in the University of Technology of Compiègne (France).

Abstract:

Caseins constitute 80% of milk proteins and have great potential for producing protein-based edible films. Several problems need to be solved before casein films can be widely commercialized. For example, the high moisture sensitivity (easy adsorption and release of water molecules which act as plasticizer and affect mechanical properties) has to be controlled and the production costs due to production method have to be reduced. The goal of the present study is to obtain edible, and antimicrobial casein-based materials. The first targeted application is the development of edible labels to put on cheeses. These labels should keep a good readability during cheese ripening and commercialization, in order to guarantee the traceability of these cheeses but without sensory changes for cheeses. The current process used to produce cheese labels is a batch process implying high pressures and high temperatures during several hours, which is not compatible with thermolabile antimicrobial compounds addition. With extrusion, which is a continuous process, temperature and residence time can be adapted to preserve the activity of antimicrobial compounds added in the formulation. Casting of film forming suspensions on flat surfaces and their subsequent drying to prepare films is adequate for laboratory use and, perhaps, is sometimes also suitable for batch production. However, more efficient techniques are needed for commercial films production. Association of dairy food knowledge and polymers production processes allows a new continuous process at relatively low temperature (less than 100°C) which allows production of active films made of rennet caseins and organic acids or their salts.

Break:
Coffee Break: 15:50 - 16:05 @ Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Gagik Ghazaryan is a 3rd-year PhD student at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich), working in the group of Soft Materials. He is also affiliated to the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa) in St. Gallen, Switzerland. Gagik completed his MSc degree in Desalination and Water Treatment at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.

Abstract:

Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is a slow-crystallising polyester which exhibits brittle behaviour due to relatively fast physical ageing of the amorphous phase. This embrittlement of PLLA narrows its application window in such fields where flexibility of a polymer is required (e.g., packaging). In this work we investigated the effects of thermal rejuvenation and molecular orientation of the amorphous phase on physical ageing of oriented PLLA films with emphasis on mechanical properties. Uniaxial compression testing showed that physical ageing of the amorphous phase increases the yield stress and the associated strain softening response, both contributing to the observed embrittlement of PLLA in tension. Moreover, the strain-hardening response was found not to be influenced by physical ageing. Molecular orientation of the amorphous phase at constant crystallinity was applied by uniaxial and biaxial plastic deformation just above the glass-transition temperature (at 70 °C) up to modest plastic strains of 200 %, to avoid strain-induced crystallisation. Stress-relaxation experiments, combined with tensile testing, both as a function of ageing time, have revealed that both uniaxial and biaxial plastic deformation in excess of 100 % plastic strain, decelerates and possibly prohibits the physical ageing process. The oriented monofilaments and films have improved mechanical properties, such as stiffness, strength and strain-to-break. The latter properties were not affected by physical ageing during a testing period of 40 days. In addition, plastic deformation to higher draw ratios and/or at slightly higher temperatures (90 °C), strongly enhanced crystallinity and resulted in PLLA monofilaments and films that also exhibited tough behaviour not affected by physical ageing.

Ryan L. Smith

Micromidas Inc., USA

Title: A chemical platform for the production of bio-PET

Time : 17:25-17:45

Speaker
Biography:

Ryan Smith is the Chief Technology Officer and Co-founder of Micromidas, Inc., a chemical technology firm that converts biomass into both conventional petrochemicals and new chemical intermediates, monomers, and resins. Mr. Smith received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of California, Davis where he was recently named the 2016 the College of Engineering Innovator of the year.

Abstract:

Fossil based plastic, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), dominates the current plastic bottle industry. To improve the carbon footprint of their packaging, and to reduce their reliance on volatile priced oil, the plastic bottle industry desires to instead produce a biobased PET bottle. The thermoplastic polymer, PET, is a product of the polymerization of monoethyleneglycol (MEG) and purified terephthalic acid (PTA). These two monomers are almost entirely sourced from fossil sources. To date there are a few commercial efforts to produce bio-based MEG from ethanol, biobased PTA however, remains unavailable in the market. PTA is itself synthesized through the oxidation of isomerically pure para-xylene, whereas para-xylene is a product of oil refining. Micromidas Inc. is a West Sacramento, California, chemical company, which converts biomass to commodity chemicals and resins. They have recently developed the technology, piloted the process, and are planning to build a first-of-akind commercial demonstration plant that will convert biomass –not oil- to polymer grade p-xylene and other monomers of interest. This talk will introduce Micromidas and aspects of its core technology.

  • Workshop Session

Session Introduction

Richard A. Gross

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA

Title: Biocatalytic routes to monomers and polymers

Time : 16:25-17:25

Speaker
Biography:

Richard A Gross is currently a Full Professor and a Constellation Chaired Professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). His research is focused on developing biocatalytic routes to biobased materials including monomers, macromers, prepolymers, polymers, surfactants and other biochemicals. He has over 500 publications in peer reviewed journals, been cited about 18,000 times (h-index 71), edited 7 books and has 26 patents (granted or filed). He was the recipient of the 2003 Presidential Green Chemistry Award in the academic category. In 2010, he was selected as the Turner Alfrey Visiting Professor, and in 2015 he became a Fellow of the ACS Polymer Division. He founded SyntheZyme LLC in 2009 and serves as CTO.

Abstract:

This workshop will discuss the rapid evolution of biotechnological methods that are enabling commercially important new routes to biobased monomers and polymers. Topics will include fundamental concepts involved in both cell free and whole cell biocatalysis, successful new product development as well as challenges that must be overcome. Furthermore, relative merits will be given for biocatalysis, chemical catalysis and how these methods can be successfully integrated.